My Plethora of Thoughts Mused in a Bucolic Setting

Just as I’m getting in the habit of writing again, I’m afraid some outside alien might be infiltrating my brain.  Last month I started a post about my three favorite words and as soon as I hit ‘Save Draft’, almost every blog I read was about favorite or interesting words. What’s causing this synchronicity?   I’m relatively new to the blogging world, so I don’t know if this is a common occurrence.  I’d like to think it’s some cosmic merging of all the greatest of minds leading us to all blog simultaneously on the same subject. Okay, maybe  it’s a merging of the greatest creative minds.  I’d even settle for a mind merging of decent typist suffering from lexophilia.
Master Minds
Image via Wikipedia
Because of my tendency to procrastinate, two of my favorite words have already been raved over by others.  I’ll just take a moment to add my thoughts. The first word I love is ‘bucolic’. What writer doesn’t love this word?  It instantly places you in a rural scene without the writer having to go into a lot of description.  As you visualize the setting, you can almost smell the nature.  It’s a much nicer sensory trip than the sensory trip experienced when writing the similar word ,’bulimic’.

The second word is ‘plethora’.  Although this lovely word, which means a large quantity,  is often found on standardized test, I somehow missed it in the SAT study guides of high school.  I’m sure I’ve read it many times in books and  intended to look it up,  but never did.  I was in my thirties before I actually heard it used in conversation and I fell in love with it.  Of course when I finally had my first chance to use it months later, I pronounced it incorrectly and continued this mistake until someone had the nerve to correct me.  Luckily I hadn’t used it often enough to cause a great deal of lost sleep over my blunder.   For years, it remained my #1 favorite.

C. S. Lewis
C. S. Lewis Image via Wikipedia

I have to thank Mr. C.S. Lewis for my new favorite word.  The word is ‘quisling’.  Now by itself it’s an intriguing word but Lewis actually referred to ‘filthy quislings’.  Well that’s just doubly intriguing.  I’m sure to some this is not a new word but I can’t remember ever seeing it before reading Mere Christianity.  A quisling, especially a filthy quisling, is basically a traitor.  I don’t remember my History books using this term when we discussed Benedict Arnold.  Of course, there’s not a lot I remember from History classes, so it may have been used frequently.

Now my problem is trying to fit this word into conversation.  It’s hard to throw it around if you’re not in the military or politics.  My friends and I rarely talk of traitors.  Maybe around Easter I can start a heated discussion on  Judas and throw in my new favorite word.  And, don’t worry,  I double checked the pronunciation in the dictionary.

24 comments

  1. I love language. I love the way words sound. I love the way they roll off your tongue. I love the way they spill out of your lips or onto the printed page and take on a life of their own! Great post!

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  2. I remember the first time I tried to pronounce the word Onyx. It was one of my first jobs and came across it in a sales order and didn’t know what it meant. Had never seen the word prior to that. My boss laughed and laughed at me for saying Onx. Yup, never forgot that word, I was ready for the next time. But it never seems to come up in conversation.

    I love that the dictionary websites you can hear the word pronounced.
    http://www.answers.com/topic/onyx

    Just like my mom tried to argue with me over how to pronounce aspartame.

    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/aspartame

    (she was misprouncing because she heard a newscaster say it as-part-uh-me.) I automatically thought I was wrong, but I was actually correct!

    **So, at least you and I didn’t have our misprounciations broadcasted on television. That’s always a plus! 🙂

    Sandi
    http://www.ahhsome.wordpress.com
    lake Forest, CA

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  3. H’mmmm. Now you’ve got me musing and pondering my favorite words! I, too, love the word “plethora”, just because of the way the soft “th” lands in the middle. I personally love the now outdated word “cellophane” because of the sound the word makes, and the sound that the substance makes! Very musical of me, no?
    Great post!

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  4. I’ve had a busy day, but each time I checked my email, I saw “My Plethora of Thoughts Mused in a Bucolic Setting” waiting patiently for me to open it. I thought that looks interesting, but I had to deal with less intriguing mail first, then myriad chores, dinner, etc., etc. Now, here it is at 11:41 p.m and I finally opened this post. It was everything I hoped it would be, except I’m not happy with the meaning of quisling.

    What if we just come up with a new meaning?
    I’ve had a busy day, but each time I checked my email, I saw “My Plethora of Thoughts Mused in a Bucolic Setting” waiting quislingly for me to open it. I thought that looks quisling, but I had to deal with less quisling mail first, then quisling chores, dinner, etc., etc. Now, here it is at 11:41 p.m and I finally opened this post. It was everything I hoped it would be, except I’m not happy with the meaning of quisling.

    We can do this, it happens all the time – just stick it in the urban dictionary – it doesn’t even need a “u” after the “q” but I like the “u.”

    Fun post !

    Like

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